Book Review: The Collected Home

Those who love a clean, refined yet comfortable spaces will find inspiration from designer Darryl Carter's perspective on the home.

In The New Traditional, Darryl Carter laid out the principles of his recognized design aesthetic, which balances individual comfort with a subtle color palette to achieve serene and timeless style. Now, Darryl explores the essence of what brings a home to life, from textures to multipurpose furniture to unexpected objects.

The Collected Home dazzles with gorgeous photographs of rooms and details, and enlightening text about what makes a space extraordinary. Additionally, Darryl provides--for the first time ever--hands-on advice for approaching home design, such as defining short- and long-term goals, from selecting an antique door knocker to planning the architectural elements of an addition.

Lavishly illustrated, this book is a must-have for anyone who desires a home that feels richly layered, full of character, and unquestionably calm.

Reviews:

By Murali Narasimhan

As a designer, every time I see Darryl's work, I marvel at his talent to "white out" what would otherwise be same old traditional or colonial spaces. In other words, he can take your typical (and sometimes cluttered) design and edit it, clarify it to such a poetic yet livable state, that you wonder how modern it is despite the very colonial roots. Not that anything is wrong with color or traditional design (I'm a fan of both), but his work feels like the antithesis to hundreds of well-designed but boring spaces that seem to have a complete lack of innovative design given the modern world we live in. His second book, The Collected Home, is a heart-felt rendition of some of his latest work, his aesthetics and guiding principles. I particularly enjoyed the photographs that beautifully illustrate his strong emphasis on architectural integrity and how little ornamentation you really need if the bones are exceptionally designed. A personal favorite quote from the book, as he describes his first show house experience "..young and intimidated by the veteran designers also presenting their work, I thought, "This is not at all the way a home should be experienced."" Knowing the context, I can completely relate to that feeling - Raji Radhakrishnan / Murali Narasimhan

By NJLeoOH

This book inspired me. I sat through only about 10-15 pages before jumping up, moving furniture, shelves, display items, putting items away and taking others out for prominent positioning. I discovered my colors (which were there all along but I didn't see them!). Highly recommend and have shared my copy with friends for their own inspiration.

By Marco Antonio Abarca

Modernism was in part a reaction to the excessive ornamentation that characterized the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Century. Modernists craved clean lines and simplicity. Function rather than beauty dictated form. Some early modernists thinkers decried ornamentation as a crime. In pursuit of their aesthetic project, the modernists rejected 2,500 years of classical wisdom.It is into this hotly waged conflict that Darryl Carter enters. With great tact, Carter strips away excessive ornamentation and works his way back to the nature inspired origins of classical thought. He is able to find common ground between these two not so disimilar aesthetics. Carter has the artist's gift of mixing what initially appear to be dissimilar objects and finding a coherent overall vision. His "cool" approach reminds of Swedish neo-classicism. This is Carter's second book. Like his first book, "The Collected Home" is a great success. Highly recommended.

 

Darryl Carter- Veranda Magazine

An unusually low ceiling prevented Carter from installing a chandelier in a client’s dining room, forcing him to be creative. By using a pair of tall, Baroque-style table lamps instead of a ceiling fixture, he created a different kind of focal point.

Darryl Carter- Rustic Farmhouse Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- Rustic Farmhouse Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- Rustic Farmhouse Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- His Shop- Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- Veranda Magazine

Carter gives a sparse attic room a styled look with an array of artworks hung, surprisingly, on the angled ceiling. The matching white frames, tonal prints, and casual arrangement don’t overwhelm the nook.

Darryl Carter- Veranda Magazine

Four pierced metal skids—surfaces used in the plaster-making process—went from serving as tools in the creation of art to being art in their own right when Carter hung them as a quadtych. “Look at things from all different angles, especially objects that are meaningful to you and things that you wouldn’t typically think of as art,” he writes. “Because they look intriguing, they often ignite conversation.”

Darryl Carter- June 2012 Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- June 2012 Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- June 2012 Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- June 2012 Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- June 2012 Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- June 2012 Elle Decor

Darryl Carter- His Collected Home- Elle Decor

Darryl Carter Architectural Digest


Washington, D.C., decorator Darryl Carter certainly makes success look easy. Fifteen years ago he had a busy career as a lawyer when he decided to change course and open his own interior-design firm. He has established himself with surprising speed, transforming rooms in project after project with an effortless style grounded in a neutral palette (white, in all its possible tones, is a favorite, especially Benjamin Moore’s Moonlight White) and an appreciation for sculptural silhouettes.

Darryl Carter- Architectural Digest

Cool neutrals and crisp furnishings lend a lovely, liberated air to a Tudor Revival house by architect Donald Lococo and designer Darryl Carter

Carter conceived the sofas, the cocktail table is attributed to Jansen, and a Renaissance Revival armchair stands alongside an antique French daybed; the paneling is painted in a white from Carter’s line for Benjamin Moore.

Darryl Carter- Architectural Digest

A circa-1830 Swedish pedestal table topped with a Ming-dynasty jar centers the entrance hall of a Washington, D.C.–area house by interior designer Darryl Carter and architect Donald Lococo.

One bedroom is anchored by a 19th-century four-poster; Highland Court fabrics were used for the custom-made curtains, duvet, and European shams, and the sisal rug is by Stark Carpet.

The library features a William IV–style sofa by Lee Stanton Antiques and a Gothic-style oak table grouped with an 18th-century English wing chair, from Golden & Assoc. Antiques, dressed in an Edelman leather and a Larsen fabric from Cowtan & Tout.

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